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SC bans sale and registration of Bharat Stage-III vehicles

The Supreme Court of India has banned the sale and registration of vehicles that do not comply with BS IV emission norms from 1 April. The apex court observed that the “health of the people is more important than the commercial interest of automobile manufactures”.

The judgment gains importance in the light of Automakers objection that it increases burden on them and the decision is against the already stressed economy of India.

OBJECTION OF AUTOMAKERS

  1. Such up gradation requires huge investment on research and large time gap. This can be compensated by increased prices of vehicles. Indian market being price sensitive raises the concern of automakers.
  2. Presently the industry, according to Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM), has large stock pile of vehicles, which they have to dispose off; otherwise they will have to face financial trouble.
  3. BS-IV norm vehicles require BS-IV fuel, which according to SIAM is not available in the entire country. The BS IV grade fuel was introduced in 2010 and is available in 39 cities, as reported in 2016. The rest of the country has to do with BS III fuel.

GOVERNMENT ARGUMENT

Automakers were given sufficient time to upgrade and so any stockpile of vehicle is their problem.

THE WAY OUT FOR AUTOMAKER

  1. Automakers should increase their export, to sale their remaining stocks in other countries where EURO STAGE III vehicles are still used.
  2. They should make changes to upgrade BS III vehicles to BS IV ones

NEED OF BS IV VEHICLES

  1. India has ratified Paris Agreement and such steps are needed to achieve our self designated targets.
  2. India has one of the most polluted environments that is causing health hazard. Health cost is more than this up gradation cost.
  3. We need to have sustainable environment and sustainable economy.

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN BS-III & BS-IV    (Figures in g/ Km)

Emission Norms BS-III BS-IV
Petrol Emission Norms CO 0.20` 0.10
Hydro-carbon 0.15 0.08
HC + NOX - 0.005
Diesel Emission Norms Hydro-carbon 0.5 0.25
NOX 0.56 0.30
HC + NOX 0.05 0.025
Sulphur content 350 ppm 50 ppm

Criticism

  1. BS norms does not prescribe any standard CO2 emission limit for vehicles
  2. There is no provision to make the CO2emissions labeling mandatory on cars in our country.
  3. We consider BS Norms equivalent to EURO Norms, however, prescribed load, speed as well as height parameters of BS Norms are too liberal as compared to Euro Norms, i.e. Indian norms lag the Euro norms

REGULATORY FRAMEWORK IN INDIA

In India the Rules and Regulations related to driving licence, registration of motor vehicles, control of traffic, construction & maintenance of motor vehicles etc. are governed by

  1. The Motor Vehicles Act 1988 (MVA) and
  2. The Central Motor Vehicles rules 1989 (CMVR).

Nodal Agency: The Ministry of Shipping, Road Transport & Highways (MoSRT&H) acts as a nodal agency for formulation and implementation of various provisions of the Motor Vehicle Act and CMVR.

Committees to advise MoSRT&H: To involve all stake holders in regulation formulation, MoSRT&H has constituted two Committees to deliberate and advise Ministry on issues relating to Safety and Emission Regulations, namely –

  1. CMVR- Technical Standing Committee (CMVR-TSC)
  2. Standing Committee on Implementation of Emission Legislation (SCOE)

 

 

 

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